Cold storage is a necessity for many foods, but the chilly air of the fridge can have a negative effect on some healthy favorites. Keep these foods at their best by keeping them out of the fridge.

In an ideal world, you’d never need to put produce in the fridge. You’d go to the market before each meal, pick up your locally-grown vegetables, walk home, unpack, and start cooking right away. There’d be no need for refrigeration at all. And that sounds nice, but that’s definitely not the world we live in. Some produce needs to go in the fridge, because we don’t have the time or energy to go to the market three times a day.

But there are also some fruits and vegetables that would prefer to be left out on the counter. Or in a little ceramic pot on top of the fridge. Or in a cabinet under the drawer where all your spoons and ladles go. You shouldn’t just go throwing everything in the fridge. Here are the fruits and vegetables that are best kept outside the fridge:

Pineapple

Once you pick a pineapple, it doesn’t get any riper, so you should try to buy a perfectly ripe pineapple with the intention of eating it sooner rather than later. That also means that you should just leave it at room temperature—keeping it in the fridge isn’t going to have an effect on its ripeness.

Melon

You could put melons in the fridge…if you really wanted to. But we prefer to eat melons at room temperature, so the flesh is as soft as possible. Changing the temperature of the melon will tense up the interior, possibly making it a tad less succulent.

Tomatoes

The countertop, not the fridge, is the best spot for this summertime bit of goodness. The cold temps in a fridge mess with the deliciousness of their texture.

Banana

Bananas need room temperature for two reasons: The warm temperatures help the fruit finish ripening (in case you pick up any still-green pieces) and the light and air slow down decay.

Potatoes

Which also need to live in room-temperature storage to maintain their texture. These two are not happy pantry bedfellows; the gases released by the two tend to accelerate spoilage.

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